Tuesday, 1 May 2018

Students' hard work helping classmates' grades

The Times Higher Education reports on a recent Maastricht University study which shows that less hard-working students who are placed in study groups with more diligent and less “risk-taking” peers get better grades without doing any extra work. The researchers’ findings suggest that university students’ level of achievement can be influenced by the personalities of their fellow students and they conclude that the study has "important implications for the design of interventions and education policies that aim to improve socio-emotional skills”. Read more by following the link below to the library e-journals, or sign up for a free account with the THE.  

Coloured balloons

Students' hard work helping classmates' grades

More university students cheating

Based on their recent investigation into academic misconduct, the Guardian Higher Education reports that the number of students caught cheating at Russell Group universities has increased by 40% in the period from 2014-15 to 2016-17. The Times have also reported on more than 50,000 cases of cheating at British universities in a three-year period between 2013 and 2016. The article claims that tuition fees and the stress of securing a job mean that students are fixated on exam results, rather than intellectual development which in turn undermines the entire purpose of universities. Read more by following the link below to the Guardian.  

Calendar on students̢۪ bedroom wall, at halls of residence showing exams.

More university students cheating

Monday, 30 April 2018

Academics behaving badly

We have all been there, when someone in the audience at a conference or seminar asks the presenter a question which seems to be less about wanting an answer than giving a lengthy display of their own superior knowledge. Pat Thomson on her Patter blog writes amusingly about these Dr. Cleverclogs who have an opinion on everything and who want to let you know everything that they know. Read more by following the link below to her blog.  

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Academics behaving badly



Friday, 27 April 2018

Collective supervision improves PhD completion

According to a recently published article in the journal Higher Education Research and Development, PhD students who are supervised collectively rather than individually are quicker to complete their theses. Writing on the LSE Impact blog, the authors claim that while most students would prefer supervision by a single expert whose suggestions are motivated uniquely by that student's doctoral research, the research literature suggests that collective supervision offers greater advantages including the enhancement of peer learning and the broadening of the academic learning context and the pool of knowledge. Read more by following the link below to the LSE blog which also cites the original research study. 


Monday, 16 April 2018

Review "How to be an academic superhero"

A new book by Iain Hay entitled "How to be an academic superhero: establishing and sustaining a career in the social sciences, arts and humanities" is reviewed by the Impact blog on The London School of Economics website. The book offers a valuable and realistic guide for early-career academics on how to develop their careers while meeting the ever-growing expectations of universities. Read more by following the link below to the review. The book is on order for Bolton Street LTT collection and is already on the shelves in Aungier Street library. 



How to be an academic superhero

Wednesday, 11 April 2018

Small changes to your teaching

A recent article in the Chronicle of Higher Education offers four quick ways to shift students’ attention from life’s distractions to your course content. James Lang suggests that the first few minutes of a class is a rich opportunity to capture the attention of students and prepare them for learning. This article is the second in a series which shows how small changes can impact and improve learning and teaching in higher education. Read more by following the link below to the journal.  



Small changes to your teaching